Dakota Allen Jersey

With the final pick of the Rams’ 2019 draft, general manager Les Snead called linebacker Dakota Allen out of Texas Tech.

Allen’s time at Texas Tech was split with a season at East Mississippi State Community College — the school featured on Seasons 1 and 2 of Netflix’s original series ‘Last Chance U’, a multi-part documentary in which ‘Elite athletes with difficult pasts turn to junior college football for a last shot at turning their lives around and achieving their dreams.’

Allen landed at EMCC after an off the field issue following his redshirt freshman season at Tech. It was an experience that the newest Ram said both thrust him into the spotlight and saved his relationship with the game.

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With their final pick in the 2019 NFL draft, the Los Angeles Rams strayed away from their usual strategy of picking players with clean backgrounds. Sean McVay and Les Snead have talked at length about adding high-character, players, team captains and players who also performed in the classroom, but they took a chance on someone with a troubled past at No. 251 overall.

They selected Dakota Allen out of Texas Tech, who many know from the hit series “Last Chance U.” Allen was dismissed from the football team and expelled from the university after being arrested for second-degree burglary in 2016. He enrolled at East Mississippi Community College and played a season there before going back to Texas Tech in 2017.

The Rams finished off the 2019 NFL Draft with two seventh-round selections in Penn State DB Nick Scott at No. 243, and LB Dakota Allen at No. 251.The Los Angeles Rams have officially wrapped up their 2019 draft class, selecting Texas Tech linebacker Dakota Allen with the 251st overall pick.

Scott was originally recruited by Penn State as a running back, but swiftly moved to safety with Giants running back Saquon Barkley a featured member of the Nittany Lions backfield. As a senior, Scott led the team with three interceptions — he finished his college career with 114 total tackles, five passes defensed, 2.5 tackles for loss, a sack, and three picks.

Scott wasn’t invited to the NFL Combine following his final season at Penn State, but that didn’t bother special teams coordinator John Fassel, who’s eyeing the former Penn State Special Teams Player of the Year as the next member of his unit.For Dakota Allen and Ronald Ollie, their “last chance” turned into a dream come true.

The pair, who were featured in Netflix’s popular series “Last Chance U” in its first season when it covered East Mississippi Community College, have found NFL homes. Allen was drafted in the seventh round by the Los Angeles Rams, and Ollie is headed to the Oakland Raiders, according to ESPN.

“When I first left Texas Tech, I thought I was never going to play football again. That’s why I was so grateful and thankful for the opportunity that East Mississippi provided me. Then once I got that opportunity, I just took it and ran with it. I honestly can’t believe I’m an L.A. Ram.”

Allen was a three-year starter for the Red Raiders, playing 34 total games in his career. He made 249 total tackles, recorded two sacks and picked off four passes.

He was viewed as a late-round prospect or a priority free agent, bringing good effort and toughness to the defense. At the combine, he ran a 4.77-second 40-yard dash, so he isn’t the fastest linebacker.

After being dismissed from Texas Tech in 2016, he attended East Mississippi Community College, the subject of Netflix’s hit series, “Last Chance U.” He earned All-Region honors with 117 tackles that season and was able to re-enroll in 2017.

“The combine was being aired on television and he was the first coach that called me while he was at the combine,” Scott said of Fassel. “He said, ‘Hey Nick I’m looking at your film and I’m extremely surprised that you’re not here right now.’ We’ve been in contact ever since then and he told me he was going to draft me and ke kept his word.”

Nicholas Scott Jersey

In 2016, the Philadelphia Eagles used their sixth-round pick to select cornerback Blake Countess 196th overall.

An undersized defensive back who split time between Michigan and Auburn in college, the 5-foot-10, 191 pound Maryland native really popped at the Reese’s Senior Bowl, showing impressive ball skills, while looking like the kind of player who could potentially squeak onto the roster as a rookie.

Was the move initially panned? Sure, many didn’t have Countess as a draftable player coming out of college, including NFL.com contributor Lance Zierlein , who gave him a ‘Back end of the roster‘ grade, but after trading away incumbent starter Byron Maxwell to the Miami Dolphins and only replacing him with Jim Schwartz lifers Leodis McKelvin and Ron Brooks, the team was in need of cornerback help badly.

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Fortunately, they found it with their very next pick, as they selected Jalen Mills 233rd overall.

Though some initially pondered which player would make the team, as Mills had issues both off the field and with measurables, the LSU product clearly won out and has remained a starter on the team to this day.

Countess, on the other hand, was offered a spot on the practice squad after initially being waived in the trim down to 53, but he declined; instead heading west to join the Los Angeles Rams, where he was elevated to the active roster on November 18, 2016.

From there, Countess spent two additional seasons with the club, splitting time between cornerback and safety as a flex reserve off the bench. Though he never quite made it into the starting lineup with much regularity, starting four games over 37 appearances, the Rams valued his contributions enough to offer him a $2 million tender to remain with the team in 2019 as a restricted free agent.

However, after the draft, his standings quickly changed.

After selecting two safeties, Taylor Rapp and Nicholas Scott in the 2019 NFL Draft, drafting John Johnson in 2018, and signing Eric Weddle in free agency, the Rams’ brass asked Countess to take a pay cut to remain on the roster moving forward; a proposition he declined according to Ian Rapoport.

In 2016, the Philadelphia Eagles used their sixth-round pick to select cornerback Blake Countess 196th overall.

An undersized defensive back who split time between Michigan and Auburn in college, the 5-foot-10, 191 pound Maryland native really popped at the Reese’s Senior Bowl, showing impressive ball skills, while looking like the kind of player who could potentially squeak onto the roster as a rookie.

From there, Countess spent two additional seasons with the club, splitting time between cornerback and safety as a flex reserve off the bench. Though he never quite made it into the starting lineup with much regularity, starting four games over 37 appearances, the Rams valued his contributions enough to offer him a $2 million tender to remain with the team in 2019 as a restricted free agent.

However, after the draft, his standings quickly changed.

After selecting two safeties, Taylor Rapp and Nicholas Scott in the 2019 NFL Draft, drafting John Johnson in 2018, and signing Eric Weddle in free agency, the Rams’ brass asked Countess to take a pay cut to remain on the roster moving forward; a proposition he declined according to Ian Rapoport.

While one could argue who has a higher upside between Countess or 2018 fourth-round pick Avonte Maddox, another pint-sized college corner turned safety, it’s clear having both players on the roster behind all-world utility man Malcolm Jenkins and the oft-injured Rodney McLeod would give the team more depth and optionality than just sticking with what they already have.

Was the move initially panned? Sure, many didn’t have Countess as a draftable player coming out of college, including NFL.com contributor Lance Zierlein , who gave him a ‘Back end of the roster‘ grade, but after trading away incumbent starter Byron Maxwell to the Miami Dolphins and only replacing him with Jim Schwartz lifers Leodis McKelvin and Ron Brooks, the team was in need of cornerback help badly.

David Edwards Jersey

When the pick was announced that the Los Angeles Rams were taking Wisconsin offensive tackle David Edwards, there was some uncertainty about where he’ll play on the offensive line. After all, the Rams have two of the best tackles in the league in Andrew Whitworth and Rob Havenstein, and Edwards only played right tackle for the Badgers.

Being a former tight end and high school quarterback, Edwards is a good athlete with solid movement skills for a man his size. He’s going to get a shot to play at positions besides right tackle, which offensive line coach Aaron Kromer made very clear on Saturday afternoon.

“You always ask that and I always tell you the same thing,” Kromer joyfully told Myles Simmons, who asked where Edwards will play. “He’s going to play four spots. He’s going to play both tackles and both guards. It’s the fastest way to learn football and then we’ll find out where he fits best.”

This is the typical approach for the Rams with Kromer coaching the offensive linemen. He loves to “cross-train” them, as Sean McVay says, trying them at multiple positions before settling at one spot. Rodger Saffold played several spots before Kromer arrived in 2017 and locked him in at left guard.

North Carolina State’s Garrett Bradbury isn’t the only former tight end in this 2019 NFL Draft class to move to the offensive line. David Edwards, an immediate endorsement of Wisconsin’s coaching staff’s ability to develop offensive linemen, has a chance to be the best drafted out of this Badger crop in this cycle.

Edwards returned to Madison in 2018, shunning a potential NFL career to chase a Big Ten Championship. While that didn’t go as planned for Wisconsin, it also didn’t go as planned for Edwards, who was hampered by a reported shoulder injury which both negatively affected his play, but also his draft stock. Edwards’ athleticism gives him the highest upside of any Badger linemen in this draft.

Offensive line depth was a pretty significant concern for the Los Angeles Rams entering the 2019 NFL draft after losing Rodger Saffold and parting ways with John Sullivan. Whether it was at guard, tackle or center, the Rams were bound to inject some young talent into the roster at some point.

They did exactly that with Bobby Evans in Round 3, and in the fifth round, they also added offensive tackle David Edwards out of Wisconsin. Evans can play any position except for center on the offensive line, but that’s not the case with Edwards – at least not right now.

He’s only played tackle for three years after being a high school quarterback and playing some tight end. It’s possible the Rams see him as depth inside at guard too, but the likeliest scenario is him backing up Rob Havenstein at right tackle.The NFL Draft has come and gone, and several former Badgers are now employed to play at the next level.

Expectations were high coming into the weekend with six of Head Coach Paul Chryst’s former players projected to be drafted.

While four of these players — offensive lineman Michael Deiter, linebacker Ryan Connelly, LB Andrew Van Ginkel and OL David Edwards — did have their names called during the draft, the overall trend saw former Badgers fall far below where they were projected to be taken.Here are the full results from Wisconsin’s weekend at the draft and how the players will fit with their new teams.Cam DaSilva notes some specific reasons such as Head Coach Sean McVay getting his hands on RB Darrell Henderson, Greg Gaines’ ability as a run defender, and the stacked secondary as reasons to be excited about the draft the Rams just had

David Edwards pegged as Rams’ biggest steal in the draft | Rams WireNFL Draft Wire’s Luke Easterling pegs Wisconsin Badgers OT David Edwards as the biggest steal in the Rams’ draftNdamukong Suh still in search of new team | Ramblin’ Fan

The Rams’ addition of Greg Gaines likely spells the end (if the salary cap didn’t already) of Ndamukong Suh’s Rams career, though May 7th is the deadline for compensatory picks being affected by adding unrestricted free agents, so the end of Suh’s free agency could be coming to an end shortly

Greg Gaines Jersey

Greg Gaines came to UW from La Habra High School in Orange County, California. He had committed to Chris Petersen at Boise State in 2014, and was one of a few guys Pete decided could fit at Washington as well (Jaylen Johnson and Drew Sample were a couple others). Gaines arrived with little fan fare, and many fans, myself included, weren’t blown away with the commitment from the 3-star DT. However, it didn’t take long to see that he embodied everything Chris Petersen wants in a footballer.

GFG entered a game the first time during his redshirt freshman season, replacing an injured Elijah Qualls. It was noticeable from his very first play that he was going to be a tough, space eating defensive tackle. On the West Coast, where it is increasingly difficult to find true “two gap” DTs (Vita Vea is the ultimate example of this), the Huskies got a good one in Gaines. People like me often overuse the word “stout” to describe an interior defender, but few words describe his game better. After spending 2 years earning Honorable Mention All Pac-12 honors, he earned 2nd team his junior year, before finally emerging as the first team DT in 2018. He also won the Morris Trophy, voted on by fellow players as the toughest lineman to face.

Greg Gaines was a remarkably consistent performer for the Huskies in his four years. His sack, tackle, and TFL numbers generally improved every year, but from his first play, he showed an ability to hold his ground and not get blown off the ball. His raw strength, hustle, and motor help him play with a very strong anchor vs the run. You see when he attacks double teams – a lot of DTs can take those plays off – Gaines is a very willing fighter. He knows how to attack the crease of the double team and split it on occasion. He’s also pretty good at sliding off his block and making a tackle in the hole, before a running back gets too much space. While he doesn’t have a deep arsenal of pass rush moves, his bull rush is very powerful and can be used to create interior pressure. Gaines very clearly knows his strengths and plays to them.

Idaho quarterback Matt Linehan, left, is sacked by Washington defensive lineman Greg Gaines (99) in the first half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Where teams might hesitate on Gaines is something he can’t control – his arm length. At 31 inches, his arms are firmly in the “stubby” category, according to scouts. This primarily hinders him when it comes to pass rushing and being more disruptive at the point of attack. He can sometimes get locked onto an OL and have a hard time disengaging because of that lack of length. He’s also not the most flexible and his change of direction could improve.

So, there are probably some better DTs out there in the draft, but there was a reason you kept hearing “no one wants to block Greg Gaines” coming out of senior bowl practice. He’s a load. Greg Gaines should be drafted sometime on day 3, and possibly even day 2. His arm length likely makes him a non-starter for a number of teams, unfortunately. But, his play strength, production, motor, and attitude make him a good fit as a NT in a 4-3 scheme.

He displayed decent athleticism at the NFL combine, accruing a SPARQ score that would put him the 37th percentile of NFL DTs. It’s a fairly deep year for defensive tackles which makes me feel like he’s destined for day 3. However, he was problematic for the OL to block at the senior bowl so that could perhaps push him into day 2.

Yet in today’s NFL, pass rush is highly valued, and that is potentially the weakest part of Gaines game. So with that, I’m calling him a 5th-6th round pick.With the 134th overall pick, the Rams selected defensive lineman Greg Gaines. He’ll join safety Taylor Rapp in Los Angeles. Rapp was taken by the Rams in the third round on Friday. Gaines was awarded the 2018 Morris Trophy, given to the top defensive lineman in the Pac-12 as voted by opposing team players. A 2018 All-Pac-12 first-team selection, Gaines started 47 games in his UW career, including every game of his final three seasons.

The Green Bay Packers hosted a top-30 visit with Washington defensive lineman Greg Gaines, a three-time All-Pac-12 selection and the 2018 winner of the Morris Trophy.Gaines (6-1, 312) played in a school record 54 games over four seasons, tallying 148 tackles, 20.5 tackles for losses, 9.5 sacks, four pass breakups, an interception and a fumble recovery. As a senior, Gaines produced 55 tackles, 6.5 tackles for losses and 3.5 sacks and won the Morris Trophy, which is awarded to the Pac-12’s top defensive lineman based on votes from opposing players.

Gaines is considered a tough and active nose tackle who is tough to move at the point of attack, disruptive against the run and surprisingly good as a pocket collapser.

Bobby Evans Jersey

Cody Ford went in the second round (No. 38 overall) to the Bills, Bobby Evans went in the third round (No. 97 overall) to the Rams, both Dru Samia (No. 114 overall) and Ben Powers (No. 123 overall) went in the fourth. This all comes after the Sooners offensive line won the Joe Moore Award for 2018, recognizing the nation’s best collective o-line unit.

While the draft and award both speak to the tremendous collection of individual talent assembled this past season, more than that it highlights offensive line coach Bill Bedenbuagh’s tremendous acumen for developing high-quality athletes on the front line.

Since Bedenbaugh’s arrival in 2013 Oklahoma football has averaged no less than 217 yards per game on the ground each season and have produced eight NFL draft picks on the offensive line including this past year’s historic haul.

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Bedenbuagh has been a talented recruiter, but his real skill comes once he gets guys onto campus. Two years ago he turned Orlando Brown from the No. 37 tackle in the 2014 class into the best left tackle in college football. He made Cody Ford an NFL prospect at four different potential positions. He had the foresight to move Bobby Evans over to left tackle to take the place of Brown this past season and he was patient enough with Dru Samia, moving him to a few different positions before finding his natural home at right guard.

Bedenbuagh has a knack for seeing the big picture and moving every piece into the proper place to serve it.Eagles alum Kyler Murray began the processions as the draft’s top overall pick to the Arizona Cardinals on Thursday night, and two of his high school teammates followed suit by hearing their names called during the second day of the draft.

Allen’s offensive line took center stage locally, with alums Greg Little and Bobby Evans both learning their professional destinations. Little was picked early on Friday, drafted No. 37 overall to the Carolina Panthers, while Evans will head west to join the Los Angeles Rams after the Super Bowl runners-up picked the offensive lineman with the 97th pick.

The two linemen started at left tackle during their final collegiate campaigns, with Evans protecting Murray’s blind side at Oklahoma and Little anchoring the left side of the line at Ole Miss.

Little came away from his junior season with the Rebels picked as an All-America second-team selection by multiple outlets while also receiving all-SEC first-team honors. He was a finalist for the Earl Campbell Tyler Rose Award – an accolade annually given to the top offensive player in Division I football.

Evans, meanwhile, manned left tackle for a Sooner line that, together, received the Joe Moore Award for the best offensive line in the country. Evans concludes his time in Norman as a three-time all-Big 12 selection, earning second-team honors in 2018.Cody Ford didn’t get selected in the first round, but Oklahoma’s talented offensive lineman did learn where his NFL journey will begin on Friday night.

Ford was selected by the Buffalo Bills with the sixth pick in the second round of the 2019 NFL Draft.

Ford has an outstanding career for the Sooners, which included a shift from offensive guard to tackle during his senior year. He’s the first of four OU offensive linemen expected to be drafted this weekend, joining Bobby Evans, Ben Powers and Dru Samia.

Ford was among four Oklahoma players who declared early for the NFL Draft. He was a two-year starter for Oklahoma after suffering a season-ending injury three games into his redshirt freshman season.

“I’m thrilled for Cody. He had to overcome a ton here at OU with the really bad injury against Ohio State in his first year and then moving positions,” Oklahoma coach Lincoln Riley said. “He’s one of the nastiest offensive linemen I’ve ever coached, and I think he was probably the most dominant tackle in the country last year. Seeing him now as a high draft pick is amazing. His best ball is in front of him.”Bobby Evans became OU’s second offensive lineman to be selected on Friday night.

Evans was picked in the third round by the Los Angeles Rams with the 97th overall pick. The Rams moved up four spots to get Evans.Evans was a teammate of Murray at Allen (Texas) High School. He chose for early entry into the NFL Draft with Ford and the decision paid off for both.